1992 Trek 990 Hardtail


I’ve had this bike since 1993. I picked it up on closeout since it was a year old. At the time, it was one of the nicest Mountain Bikes on the market in its price range. It is beautiful with a triple butted, lugged, XO True Temper frame and good quality components. I think I paid around $800 for it then.

For most of its life I had used it as a fire road bike and for a while as a commuter. In September 2009, I started riding single track again and started modernizing the component set, but still keeping in the spirit of the original bike.

It is still a thrill. I don’t think I will ever get rid of this bike.

Bike Setup

Total weight: 26 lbs

My wish list

  • Lighter seat post with vibration damping and/or flex

Links

12 thoughts on “1992 Trek 990 Hardtail

  1. Hi Ervin. The Trek Singletracks all had a 1 1/2 inch stearer. The original forks were threaded so if you use a modern threadless fork you will need a new threadless headset as well. 1 1/2″ forks are common, but getting the axel to crown length right is important. I’m currently building up a 1991 Trek 970 from the frame. For that build, I decided to use a rigid fork and found that the Surly 1×1 forks are a very good match for the frame geometry to the SingleTracks. I will post something on that build in the next few days. Hope this helps.

    Sadly, this bike was stolen last Spring :-/

  2. Hi,
    your Trek 990 body has always inspired me and for me it is the most successful, timeless 92 Trek frame with new contemporary parts.
    I also had a Trek 990 92 in the 90s and drove it for many years.2017 I bought another Trek and built up my version of a 990 with modern parts. Original are only the frame, front derailleur and the handlebar.

    Have fun driving … with your stable machine 😉
    Greetings Wolfgang

    • Thank you for the compliments. You did a fantastic job on your 990. It looks like a joy to ride.

      Sadly, my 990 was stolen last year. After having the bike for so long with so many changes over the years, it was a tough loss. Recently I built up a 1994 970 as more of an urban assault vehicle for San Diego (which means some canyon rides are in the mix). I will post some photos of that build one of these days.

      • Hello Robert,
        that’s a shame to hear that someone has stolen your beautiful 990. Your 990 was the best and most beautiful inspiring structure on the net and it is sad to hear that any one git stole it from you :-(.
        I hope you will enjoy your “new” 970 1994 Trek as well. Thank you for your inspiration and enjoy riding your MTB.

        Kind regards Wolfgang

  3. Hello Robert,
    that’s a shame to hear that someone has stolen your beautiful 990. Your 990 was the best and most beautiful inspiring structure on the net and it is sad to hear that any one git stole it from you
    :-(.
    I hope you will enjoy your “new” 970 1994 Trek as well. Thank you for your inspiration and enjoy riding your MTB.

    Kind regards Wolfgang

  4. Hello Robert,
    that’s a shame to hear that someone has stolen your beautiful 990. Your 990 was the best and most beautiful inspiring structure on the net and it is sad to hear that any one git stole it from you :-(.
    I hope you will enjoy your “new” 970 1994 Trek as well. Thank you for your inspiration and enjoy riding your MTB.

    Kind regards Wolfgang

  5. Hello, I found a TREK 990 in very poor condition – it was missing its front and rear derailleurs and a derailleur boss on the seatstay, not to mention a seized seatpost! Fortunately, it had the rest of its original components. I’m currently in the process of restoring/breathing new life into this old girl. My question is: do you know what front and rear derailleurs were originally spec’d with this bike? I know it’s Deore DX but there’s many flavors (top pull, bottom pull, short and long cage, etc.) Was wondering if you could give me a little more detailed information. (Any model numbers on your derailleurs?) Thanks in advance.

    • Hi Jeff. The front derailleur is really odd. The cable routing is for top pull but they used a bottom pull derailleur and anchored the cable to a bolt on the back of the seat tube. I always wondered if a top pull would work better but never tried it. If you want to restore it to the original, your best bet is to start with the vintage trek catalogs and see if you can figure out what was speced with your bike. My 990 was stolen a few years ago and it was many years befor that that I converted it to 9 speed. So I really can’t be very specific though I do seem to recall that the rear derailleur cage was medium-ish. According to the ’92 catalog mine came with a 13-30 cassette if that helps.

      Here is a link to the catalogs: http://www.vintage-trek.com/TrekBrochures.htm

      If you are not sure of the year, the site has a page that lists models by color and year. Good luck on the restoration!

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